A Cheaper Society

A thought came to me as I was checking out the reviews for an iPhone app I wanted to buy. My intentions were to see how others viewed this app as compared to what I have.

You see, I am an email app junkie. I have tried numerous apps for iPhone email because I want a certain type of functionality and reliability for a large portion of my day is answering and writing emails.

The app in question was Newton, formerly known as Cloud Magic. I have used this app on my old droid, and wanted to see if the name change brought forth any tweaks to this already great app.

Online reviewers said it was a very good, in fact almost perfect for a business model. It was also written how it is pointless for a personal user because those users just don’t deal with the amount of meaningful email volume as a business would.

Fair review.

I go to the app store and see 3 stars as the average review. Seems a little off when this app is supposed to be superb for email. As I look at the reviews, I see why.

People are complaining about the subscription-based model, they are writing, “it isn’t worth the money” and leaving 1 or 2 star reviews to bring down the overall rating. Those make up almost all of the bad reviews, while the rest of the reviews are talking about how great the app is.

Essentially it comes down to this:  People were complaining about having to pay 5 dollars a month for an app they would use several times a day.

You spend 5 bucks a day on bullshit. You stop at a 7-11 and you spend 8 bucks. You grab coffee and it’s a few dollars. Five dollars a month for an email app is cheap when you look at the end picture.

We live in a unique era where mobile has taken over desktop. Apps that cost a few dollars are given negative reviews for prices. Apps that have great functionality, like Evernote, are given 1 star because you aren’t forced to pay $2.99 a month for more features and more space to use.

This applies across the board, sadly enough.

People are swiftly shifting to a “want more for much less” mentality. It isn’t enough that phone apps are vastly cheaper than PC/Mac apps used to be ten years ago. They want the power of NORAD for 99 cents.

You see this same phenomenom across the fitness world.

There are plenty of people who don’t value a service, they value what that service can do for them at a minimal profit for the craftsman. Thankfully that hasn’t taken hold en masse’ but I wonder how many more cheap online macro services or cheap training via app services are going to pop up in the next few years as this business evolves even more.

As a 42 year old man who has been through the birth of the computer age and considers himself technologically literate, it is both unnerving and exciting.

Unnerving because those of us who choose to adopt a more personalized model of online training will be undercut by cheap apps, cheap macro services, and those who utilize them to create a revenue stream.

Exciting because it also forces me to offer more value for what I do.

Things like more frequent client contact, initiating contact with current clients to check in, private groups with client only videos and discussions, bringing on board friends of mine who are SME’s to assist with information and questions that clients have.

I am thinking of new ways to bring value to a business that is shifting towards the spectrum of “cheap phone apps people bitch about”. That isn’t to say that I will never utilize apps for my business, but they will never be what my business is about.

If you want to learn more about what I offer – come visit Elite Athlete Development – send Chris and myself an email, hell just send me an email. Let’s chat. Let’s keep training personal.

 

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